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This Firefox OS-powered streaming stick is Mozilla’s answer to Chromecast


Following in the footsteps of Netflix, YouTube has just launched their Video Quality Report to rate, and possibly shame, broadband providers as the net neutrality and peering debate boils over. In my ‘hood, Verizon performs admirably, with its worst showing 8PM – 11PM with 93% of streams coming thru in high def, whereas the Comcast Xfinity service performs slightly worse across the board, bottoming out at 89% HD 8PM – 10PM. Granted, Comcast offers lower tiers of service than Verizon (as I discovered from my mother’s originally, painfully slow broadband connection… that we upgraded.) Historically, I’ve had YouTube buffering annoyances on FiOS at both my former and current locations, but that seems to have been sorted at some point – and I doubt it was ever about bandwidth, rather it was most likely in how the traffic was being handled. Google must agree as they currently rate Verizon’s regional fiber performance as YouTube HD Verified:

Users on YouTube HD Verified networks should expect smooth playback on YouTube most of the time, even when watching videos in high definition (720p).


After a several year hiatus, TiVo is once again offering Internet entrepreneurs bounties for hardware and service sales… which may or may not be related to their newly appointed CMO. Whereas TiVo previously ran with the pricey Commission Junction, and featured something like $60 commissions, the new program is hosted by Share-A-Sale and storms out of the gate with pretty hefty kickbacks for those affiliate links and banners:

Our affiliate program is providing a $100 bounty for the sale of any Roamio DVR, which range in price from $199 to $599, plus service. Sales of other products on are compensated at a 10% commission rate.

Of course, a variety of web sites and services derive a percent of their revenue via affiliate marketing (including yours truly), and I imagine this sort initiative has the potential to expand online conversation. Who knows, maybe it’s even enough incentive to get Megazone to once again fire up his blogwriter.

Yahoo will stream a live concert every day for one year


Amazon streamlines its ecosystem while continuing the assault on Dropbox:

Starting today, all personal documents that you have archived in your Kindle Library will be available to access, delete, organize, and share from your Amazon Cloud Drive. You can see these documents in a new “My Send-to-Kindle Docs” folder alongside all of your saved content such as photos and personal videos. Also starting today, new documents that you save to the cloud with Send to Kindle will be stored in their native format (e.g. MS Word, TXT) so you can access them anywhere from Amazon Cloud Drive.


As you’ve probably read during your recent Internet travels, an OpenSSL vulnerability was uncovered that puts server data at risk. Many prominent sites have since corrected the issue, dubbed Heartbleed, and its been advised that web passwords be changed. Yet, LogMeIn just reached out with an interesting twist — they believe their server infrastructure to be sound at this time and don’t require a cloud password change. Yet it’s possible our local computer passwords were put at risk, given how data is relayed:

  1. Change your Windows PCs or Macs passwords – This is for your computer login credentials only. You do not have to change your LogMeIn account login.

The real world risk of compromise based on this vector is probably minimal, especially if you use distinct usernames and passwords. But consider this an Ides of April PSA: Update your LogMeIn client software and contemplate changing your computer account password as LogMeIn continues to evaluate their (our) exposure:

In addition, our security team continues to perform a rigorous diagnostic investigation to ensure the protection of our users, and will provide additional product-specific updates if necessary.

Mohu Channels TV adapter

For all of the ink spent on Aereo (and I’m responsible for my fair share), the relatively quiet efforts of Mohu could end up being just as disruptive to the TV service market. Mohu has already had a successful run with its line of over-the-air TV antennas, but the company is ready to take its technology a step further. As Janko points out over at GigaOM, Mohu has just completed a Kickstarter campaign to help with the development of a new product called the Channels TV adapter. The adapter will combine OTA channels fed through an HD antenna (bought separately) with web video apps like Netflix and Hulu, and it will offer a personalized program guide including any channels and apps a user wants to highlight.

If Mohu can deliver a clean experience with the new Channels TV adapter – and that’s certainly a big if, particularly when it comes to switching between OTA and web content – the company will have a very compelling product offering. For the contingent of TV viewers who want broadcast TV and their $8 Netflix subscription, the Mohu device will put all of that content in one place on the living-room flat screen. Mohu isn’t offering DVR or multiscreen services (at least not yet), but it will appeal to the same audience with the Channels TV adapter as Aereo has with its monthly service. And with Mohu, there’s no additional monthly fee, and no cloud of legal drama.  Continue Reading…

dishworld While DISH may have acquiesced on the ad skipping front, in return they have inked one of the very first deals to offer “live” programming via the Internet:

The extensive and expanded distribution agreement grants DISH rights to stream cleared linear and video-on-demand content from the ABC-owned broadcast stations, ABC Family, Disney Channel, ESPN and ESPN2, as part of an Internet delivered, IP-based multichannel offering.

Of course there’s no telling when DISH might launch a web television service and certainly others (Verizon, Sony) are pursuing similar. But this represents the first time a major content provider has indicated publicly that they’re willing to play ball. So the sea change begins.